Home News Local news ERIN FORMS IN ATLANTIC; NO THREAT TO V.I.

ERIN FORMS IN ATLANTIC; NO THREAT TO V.I.

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Sept. 2, 2001 – As the peak of the Atlantic hurricane season approaches, the fifth named storm system developed over the central tropical Atlantic this weekend. Tropical Storm Erin grew out of a depression which became organized Saturday more than 1,500 miles east of the Lesser Antilles.
Hurricane forecaster Stacy Stewart said Sunday that Erin is considerably better organized than it was at depression status and its associated upper-level outflow is impressive for a storm system so early in the development stages. In fact, Stewart expects Erin to be upgraded to a hurricane on Monday. At 5 a.m. the center of Erin was located near 13.4 degrees north latitude and 38.5 degrees west longitude, about 1,410 miles east of the Lesser Antilles. With winds of 45 miles per hour, it was moving westward at nearly 20 mph.
Knight Quality Stations meteorologist Alan Archer said Sunday that computer forecast models are all in agreement that Erin will pose no threat to the Lesser Antilles or the northeastern Caribbean. "The models all take Erin to the northwest, well east of the Lesser Antilles," he said. "I think only the shipping channels will be impacted."
There is a better than 50-50 chance Erin will have no effect on the major land areas of the Caribbean, he said.
Archer did note, however, that two other areas of disturbed weather are spinning off the African coast that bear watching over the next several days.

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